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Community-Based Emergency First Responders: Explained

In The Appeal‘s Explainer series, Justice Collaborative lawyers, journalists, and other legal experts help unpack some of the most complicated issues in the criminal justice system.

Co-authors Tim Black, CAHOOTS Operations Coordinator, and Patrisse Cullors, Artist and Activist, “break down the problems behind the headlines—like bail, civil asset forfeiture, or the Brady doctrine—so that everyone can understand them. Wherever possible, we try to utilize the stories of those affected by the criminal justice system to show how these laws and principles should work, and how they often fail.”

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Black Lives Matter: A Fundraiser

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proceeds from the sale of the shirts benefit eugblac, a racial injustice organization dedicated to police abolition, equitable education and black liberation. They have established a bail out fund for Black owned businesses, and have a goal of making an official Black library that they hope will become a sanctuary for the BIPOC community.  The CAHOOTS team thanks eugblac for helping them to understand cultural humility and adopt anti-racist practices.

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Statement from the HOOTS Team

Written in collaboration by HOOTS team members with support of the White Bird Community Collective

The HOOTS (Helping Out Our Teens in Schools) program stands in solidarity with our youth, educators, and community members who are calling for our schools to prioritize the mental health needs and well-being of all students by de-funding the school resource officer (SRO) position and reallocating those funds towards support services for students. We stand with our community as it resoundingly demands that public schools be safe for all students and that school districts demonstrate a commitment to providing ample non-punitive support.

As a team of mental health and medical professionals, we see students on a daily basis who are survivors of a maladapted safety net that only exacerbates issues of poverty and oppression. Hoots believes in utilizing mediation, restorative justice and self-reflection–tools that we know to be more effective in the development of our students than criminalization and punishment. Our team encourages school administrators to work proactively to identify alternative ways in which student needs and challenges can be addressed, and we happily offer our assistance in whatever way we can. We believe that working to support students, rather than punishing them, is ultimately the path that will lead to safer schools.

We hear students of color speaking out about law enforcement presence in their schools, and the negative impact this has on their safety and ability to thrive. We need to listen and believe these voices, and allow them to lead the way toward racial justice in our school system. Despite the ubiquitous presence of SROs nationwide, very little evidence exists that supports their effectiveness at deterring acts of violence. On the contrary, in many instances, SROs have been found to perpetuate and escalate violence in schools.

Hoots pledges its support to the movement to reallocate all funding from the SRO program. We believe that students’ actions are a reflection of the care afforded to them by the community, and as such, well-compensated teachers, counselors, and support staff are what will truly make a difference in keeping students safe and healthy. We ask that all schools demonstrate their dedication to listening to the voices of students of color and their families, and the empirical evidence available showing the harm SROs can cause. We are thankful to be a part of a community that can have these challenging discussions.

White Bird’s Public Comment on the ‘Prohibited Camping Re-enforcement Rollout’

Update: On Tuesday, June 16th the Eugene Human Rights Commission unanimously voted to endorse this policy recommendation and refer it on to City Council for deliberation.

The following testimony in reference to the enforcement of the prohibited camping ordinance was submitted to the Eugene Police Commission, a twelve-member citizen body that acts in an advisory capacity to the city council, the chief of police and the city manager on police policy and resource issues. Join the Thursday, June 11 meeting via Webinar: https://eugene-or-gov.zoom.us/j/98439278535

Dear Police Commissioners,

In reference to your agenda item on the Prohibited Camping Re-enforcement Rollout, White Bird Clinic asks that EPD continue to follow CDC guidelines and not disperse encampments unless there is illegal conduct outside of camping.

Recommended Policy Focus – Harm Reduction

  1. We support EPD strategies that minimize impacts to unhoused individuals:
    1. Response to unsanctioned camping complaints should provide outreach materials including camping guidelines, social services information and referral, COVID-19 information, and COVID-19 transmission prevention strategies including waste disposal.
    2. Implementing a code of conduct for campers.
    3. Providing educational materials on conflict mediation between individuals who shelter outside and other community members.
    4. Supporting community health and safety measures.
  1. We request the City of Eugene clarify locations where sheltering in place, including sheltering in a vehicle, is permitted and where it is prohibited.
  2. Establish recovery sites for sanctioned and supported camping that allow pets, partners and possessions, with 24-hour security, bathrooms, and storage.
  3. Establish an alternative call and dispatch system to using law enforcement when a complaint only involves prohibited camping and there is no threat to public safety or crisis response necessary.

White Bird Clinic believes that ending unsheltered homelessness requires a coordinated approach that addresses social, emotional, and physical well-being. We support policy initiatives that center people with lived experience and support solution-oriented advocacy efforts that adequately fund programs effective in ending homelessness.

Supporting Materials

  • Letter from the National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty (“Law Center”) to the Mayor, City Council, and City Manager, regarding the closure of temporary shelter facilities for people experiencing homelessness in Eugene, OR during the COVID-19 crisis, and the enforcement of anti-camping ordinances against people experiencing homelessness during the COVID-19 crisis DOWNLOAD PDF
  • Interim Guidance on Unsheltered Homelessness and Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) for Homeless Service Providers and Local Officials, CDC Web Site

 

Racism is a Public Health Crisis

A Statement from CAHOOTS

Written by Ebony Morgan
CAHOOTS Crisis Intervention
Communications Team

Cahoots has been operating as a mobile crisis intervention program in Eugene since 1989. We respond in teams of two with a medic and trained crisis worker, handling 20% of the 911 calls in our area last year. This is a responsibility we take extremely seriously, and we feel privileged to do this work.

Across the nation, communities are demanding that elected leaders defund police, reallocate resources, and re-evaluate current approaches to public safety. As the first program of our kind, we are in a unique position to share our experience and knowledge with other cities that are now considering alternatives to policing. We are humbled by this and have become acutely aware of our privileged position within a system designed to oppress.

At our roots, Cahoots is innovative, forward-thinking, and dedicated to serving marginalized populations. Despite this, we are not immune to the effects of systemic racism and if we are going to lead by example, we must first do the work internally. We take responsibility for our past silence, and we commit to being advocates for change. We are actively seeking out, evaluating, and eradicating the ways that white supremacy exists within our structure and we encourage other organizations to do the same.

Cahoots proudly stands with Black Lives Matter. We believe it is not enough simply to disapprove of racism. Rather, we assert that individuals, organizations, communities, and the nation as a whole have a responsibility to be anti-racist. We will speak up when we see power inequities. We will amplify oppressed voices. We will continue to educate ourselves. We will not shy away from any aforementioned commitments due to potential risks. We will reflect regularly and welcome feedback as we learn to use our privilege constructively.

We are appalled by the lynching of George Floyd, aware that he was not the first nor the last to die a preventable death due to the color of his skin. Police brutality is not an isolated issue. It is a symptom of the broader toxic culture of white supremacy that was woven into the fiber of this nation as we know it during its inception.

Racism is a public health crisis. For the sake of health equity, we have a responsibility to dismantle systems of oppression. This will take a lot of effort and we will have to be intentional about addressing racism’s effects on the social determinants of health. We must begin this work immediately.

LA Times looks to Northwest cities to reimagine law enforcement

By RICHARD READ

SEATTLE BUREAU CHIEF
Los Angeles Times

JUNE 12, 2020

“Across the nation, political leaders are struggling to strike a balance between righting injustices in ways that might mollify those protesting racism and brutality while at the same time maintaining public safety. Some of the more original experiments in reimagining policing are unfolding in the Pacific Northwest…teams in Eugene handled 18% of the 133,000 calls to 911 last year, requesting police backup only 150 times, said Chris Hecht, executive coordinator of White Bird Clinic, which runs the operation called Cahoots. The program, short for Crisis Assistance Helping Out on the Streets, operated on a $2-million budget last year that he said saved the Eugene-Springfield, Ore., area about $14 million in costs of ambulance transport and emergency room care.

Hecht said that the teams, in place for three decades, can arrive at the scene of a homeless person experiencing a physical or mental health crisis, defuse the situation and prevent harm in ways that police officers are neither trained nor equipped to do.

“The folks we’re working with often have a history of really unfortunate interactions with police, hospitals or other institutions,” Hecht said. “When a couple of people step out of one of our vans wearing jeans and hoodies, just right there we have a leg up on our colleagues in public safety.”

Read more…

Cities Ask if It’s Time to Defund Police and ‘Reimagine’ Public Safety’

from the New York Times, June 5, 2020

“One model that members of the Minneapolis City Council cite is Cahoots, a nonprofit mobile crisis intervention program that has handled mental health calls in Eugene, OR since 1989.

CAHOOTS employees responded to more than 24,000 calls for service last year — about 20 percent of the area’s 911 calls — on a budget of about $2 million, probably far less than what it would cost the Police Department to do the work, said coordinator Tim Black.

“There’s a strong argument to be made from a fiscally conservative perspective,” Mr. Black said. “Public safety institutions generally have these massive budgets and there’s questions about what they are doing.”

Read more…

Community BIPOC Fundraiser

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Sarah Knapp from Northwest Tattoo has set up a temporary storefront featuring goods and services from local tattooers, artists, and professionals in the Eugene/ Springfield area with 100% of the profits going directly to local Black, Indigenous, People Of Color (BIPOC) supporting organizations; White Bird’s CAHOOTS program, Community Alliance of Lane County, and the Eugene-Springfield chapter of NAACP.

The fundraiser begins June 25 at https://bipocfundraiser.com and will remain open through noon on July 9.

Also See:

White Bird Statement of Solidarity with Black Lives Matter

White Bird Clinic was founded 50 years ago as an alternative for those who were alienated and disenfranchised by the dominant culture. We are outraged that half a century later there is still a lack of equality, justice, and freedom across our country. We recognize our privilege and our responsibility to employ that privilege to dismantle the racist systems, policies, and attitudes that contributed to the brutal and tragic deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and too many others before them.

As a collective, we uphold the principle that the revolution against institutional racism and genocidal violence is not contingent on what is convenient for the white community. We will begin the fight by looking within to identify all policies and practices that are rooted in racism and excise them. We will insist that our work lives up to our values and be grounded in racial equity. We will battle the systematic oppression that subjugates people of color. White Bird Clinic stands with Black Lives Matter. We see you. We reject the institutions that oppress you. We honor your voices. We act with you.

COVID-19 Centro de Recursos

Ahora Abierto

Punto de registro de lugares temporarios de refugio, suministro para tiendas de campana, evaluación de COVID-19, ropa, agua potable, estaciones de para lavarse las manos, y baños. Abierto diariamente de 9am a 5pm

341 E 12th Ave, Eugene, OR
541-342-8255

Recursos de la comunidad


Ayude a proteger nuestra comunidad

Estas son algunas ideas para mantenerse seguro

Mantenga su lugar limpio

Limpie toda las superficies que sus manos hayan tocado, antes y después de ser usadas, con tallas desinfectantes, alcohol (de al menos 60%), o cloro (agua lavandina).

Si usted se enferma

Quédese en casa si usted puede y trate de minimizar el contacto cercano con otras personas. Controle su fiebre, y evite estar con otros mientras usted este enfermos. Si usted tienen que estar alrededor de otras personas, use un barbijo así de esta manera usted no tose en los demás y transmite el virus. Si los síntomas se transforman en severos, valla al servicio médico de urgencia o al departamento de emergencia.

Cuide de usted mismo

Si usted está en cuarentena, atienda su salud mental y asegúrese de tener todo lo indispensable y el mayor apoyo posible (apoyo emocional, alimentos, higiene, medicamentos, económico) White Bird Clinic tiene servicios de telesalud, consejería, tratamientos de salud mental y los beneficios de servicios de asistencia están disponibles para ayudar.


Servicios de Crisis: White Bird es el servicio primario de Lane County de servicio gratis de intervención de crisis. Por más de 50 años, nosotros hemos estado ofreciendo servicio inmediato, a corto plazo, por teléfono las 24 horas del día.

541-687-4000
1-800-422-7558

CAHOOTS: Asistencia de ayuda en caso de crisis en las calles CAHOOTS provee 24/7 inmediata estabilización en caso de urgencia médica o crisis psicológica, información y referidos, consejería, y asesoramiento en los pasos a seguir en terapia.

Eugene: (541) 682-5111
Springfield: (541) 726-3714

COVID-19 Resource Center

The shelter-in-place program with the City of Eugene has ended but we are still providing supports to unsheltered individuals at our main facility at 341 E 12th Avenue from 9am to 5pm daily.

Our dedicated, hard-working distribution center staff provide clothing, medical screenings, mail services, personal hygiene supplies, and more to the underserved and unhoused members of our community. Take care of each other ❤️.

White Bird Clinic Receives $675,000 as Part of CARES Act

More Funding Critical as Health Centers Face Financial Uncertainty Due to Pandemic

It was announced Tuesday that 30 Oregon Community Health Centers (CHCs) will receive more than $23 million in federal funds to help health centers detect, prevent, diagnose, and treat those dealing with COVID-19, as well as maintain or increase health capacity and staffing levels to address this public health emergency. Awards in Oregon range from about $522,000 to a little over $1.7 million per health center.

Health center funding is being made available immediately, according to a news release from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health and Human Services (HHS). HHS, through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), awarded $1.3 billion to 1,387 health centers across the nation as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act.

“Oregon’s CHCs are thankful for this supplemental funding during these unprecedented times,” said Joan Watson-Patko, OPCA’s Executive Director. “However, the fact remains that additional immediate emergency funding is essential in order to keep health centers open. Oregon’s health centers have stepped up to meet the needs of the communities they serve to care for patients in response to the COVID-19 crisis, and in doing so, face huge financial losses that could impact their ability to provide care. Recent analysis estimates the financial impact of COVID-19 to health centers in Oregon is over $57 million.”

White Bird Clinic, for example, has stood up additional services and programs at significant cost and strain to existing operations. “Additional emergency dollars have made it possible for health centers to innovate and respond to their communities,” said Chris Hecht, executive coordinator at White Bird Clinic in Eugene. “However, the investments made today do not support the long-term viability of community health centers. Our programs have reduced hours and services and we’re furloughing staff to support our response to the current crisis. When it’s over, many health centers may not have the resources to reopen closed programs.”

White Bird Clinic provides primary care and dental services, a drug and alcohol treatment program, crisis intervention, and homeless case management with priority to those who are unserved, underinsured, disabled and/or homeless. “Community health centers are uniquely positioned in the health care system to immediately respond to emerging community needs in a way that isn’t possible for our government or larger health system partners,” said Hecht.

Federal Community Health Center funding is set to expire on Nov. 30 without action by Congress. “Ensuring long-term stable funding for community Health Centers is critical so Oregon CHCs can continue to provide care now during this pandemic and in the future,” said Watson-Patko. “As part of the largest primary care network in the United States, our health centers remain committed to keeping their doors open and to providing care to people who may otherwise not have access to services and those hardest hit during economic downturns.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act Supplemental Funding

$23,256,870 to support 30 health centers

HEALTH CENTER GRANTEE CITY STATE FUNDING AMOUNT
ADAPT ROSEBURG OR $567,350
ASHER COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER FOSSIL OR $522,530
BANDON COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER BANDON OR $551,075
BENTON COUNTY CORVALLIS OR $711,800
CENTRAL CITY CONCERN PORTLAND OR $663,530
CLACKAMAS, COUNTY OF OREGON CITY OR $859,565
COLUMBIA RIVER COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES BOARDMAN OR $600,230
COUNTY OF LANE EUGENE OR $1,102,715
KLAMATH HEALTH PARTNERS INC KLAMATH FALLS OR $704,840
LA CLINICA DEL VALLE FAMILY HEALTH CARE CENTER INC MEDFORD OR $1,166,525
LAPINE COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER LA PINE OR $637,175
LINCOLN, COUNTY OF NEWPORT OR $608,360
MOSAICMEDICAL PRINEVILLE OR $930,515
MULTNOMAH, COUNTY OF PORTLAND OR $1,763,780
NATIVE AMERICAN REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION INC PORTLAND OR $581,345
NEIGHBORHOOD HEALTH CENTER PORTLAND OR $872,150
NORTHWEST HUMAN SERVICES, INC. SALEM OR $733,175
ONE COMMUNITY HEALTH HOOD RIVER OR $750,950
OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY PORTLAND OR $777,770
OUTSIDE IN PORTLAND OR $640,580
RINEHART MEDICAL CLINIC WHEELER OR $522,680
ROGUE COMMUNITY HEALTH MEDFORD OR $747,845
SISKIYOU COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER, INC. GRANTS PASS OR $830,930
TILLAMOOK COUNTY TILLAMOOK OR $597,005
UMPQUA COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER, INC ROSEBURG OR $740,945
VIRGINIA GARCIA MEMORIAL HEALTH CENTER ALOHA OR $1,578,245
WALLACE MEDICAL CONCERN, THE PORTLAND OR $653,195
WATERFALL CLINIC, INCORPORATED NORTH BEND OR $576,590
WHITE BIRD CLINIC EUGENE OR $675,860
WINDING WATERS MEDICAL CLINIC ENTERPRISE OR $587,615

About CHCs:

Oregon’s community health centers deliver integrated medical, dental and behavioral health services to many of the state’s most vulnerable communities through over 200 locations statewide. Over 430,000 Oregonians receive their care at a community health center, including one in four people on the Oregon Health Plan. Over 73% of patients live below the poverty line, and 94% live at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level. Over 75% of community health centers have clinic sites serving rural communities, 30% of Oregon’s community health centers are federally recognized as Health Care for the Homeless locations, and 33% are designated as Migrant Health Centers.

Lifeline Mobile Phone Program Offering Unlimited Calling During COVID-19 Pandemic

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Lifeline program provides monthly discounts on phone and broadband service to qualifying low-income consumers (one per household). You qualify for Lifeline Based on Your Income and If You Use SNAP, Medicaid, or Other Programs.

Many fixed (landline) Lifeline carriers already offer unlimited local and toll-free calling to their subscribers, and mobile wireless Lifeline carriers that are temporarily offering unlimited calling to subscribers during the COVID-19 pandemic include the following:

For in-person assistance, stop by 323 E 12th Ave Monday through Thursday 9:30am to 1:00pm to get help completing your application from a real person or contact a carrier listed below.

Eugene/Springfield Lifeline Carriers

Mental Health Resources During COVID-19

Looking for our COVID-19 community resource page? We moved it over here.

As leaders on the frontlines of mental illness and substance abuse disorder treatment, we know how difficult it can be to cope with the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 amidst the loss of familiar resources. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment and be aware of new or worsening symptoms. The White Bird Crisis line will continue to be accessible 24/7 by phone at (541) 687-4000. For an in-person response, CAHOOTS continues to operate 24/7 at this time, if you are in Eugene please call (541) 682-5111, for those in Springfield please call (541) 726-3714.

Telehealth

Telehealth appointments are available for both new and returning Counseling and Chrysalis clients. Intake forms for new clients are now available online.

Online Support Groups

AA   NA   GA

7 Cups: www.7cups.com Free online text chat with a trained listener for emotional support and counseling. Also offers fee for-service online therapy with a licensed mental health professional. Service/website also offered in Spanish.

Emotions Anonymous: www.emotionsanonymous.org An international fellowship of people who desire to have a better sense of emotional well-being. EA members have in person and online weekly meetings available in more than 30 countries with 600 active groups worldwide. The EA is nonprofessional resource and cannot be a replacement to therapy.

Support Group Central: www.supportgroupscentral.com Offers virtual support groups on numerous mental health conditions – free or low-cost. Website also offered in Spanish.

The Tribe Wellness Community: www.support.therapytribe.com Free, online peer support groups which is tailored to members who are facing mental health challenges and/or difficult family dynamics. Support groups include Addiction, Anxiety, Depression, HIV/AIDS, LGBT, Marriage/Family, OCD and Teens.

For Like Minds: www.forlikeminds.com Online mental health support network that allows for individuals to connect with others who are living with or supporting someone with mental health conditions, substance use disorders, and stressful life events.

Guidebooks & Tip Sheets

The NAMI HelpLine Coronavirus Information and Resources Guide may be helpful if you have questions or concerns.

SAMHSA’s Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, and Isolation tip sheet describes feelings and thoughts you may have during and after social distancing, quarantine, and isolation. It also suggests ways to care for your behavioral health during these experiences and provides resources for more help.

Text/Chat

News about the coronavirus can increase feelings of anxiety. If you’re struggling, text Mental Heath First Aid to 741-741 to talk to a CrisisTextLine counselor.

HOOTS (Helping Out Our Teens in Schools) offering mental health support during school closures

In light of school closures due to COVID-19. HOOTS (Helping Out Our Teens in Schools) is offering mental health support by phone for students, families, and staff of high schools in the 4J, Springfield, Bethel, Oakridge and South Lane school districts. The phone line is staffed by crisis counselors who normally work the HOOTS school clinics, or work on CAHOOTS.

The phone line is accessible from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM Monday through Friday. Video support is available from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM on weekdays and is accessed by emailing hoots@whitebirdclinic.org with your name and preferred time. We are able to provide short term counseling and mental health support, resource referrals and OHP sign up.

  • For students, families and staff of 4J, Eugene Charter and Bethel High Schools please call (541) 246-2342.
  • For students, families and staff of Springfield, Oakridge and South Lane High Schools please call (541) 246-2332.

The White Bird Crisis line will continue to be accessible 24/7 by phone at (541) 687-4000. 15th Night will also be continuing to offer support and resources for unhoused youth and those working with them via phone and text at (541) 246-4046.

For an in-person response, CAHOOTS continues to operate 24/7 at this time, if you are in Eugene please call (541) 682-5111, for those in Springfield please call (541) 726-3714.

New Billboard Promotes White Bird Dental Clinic

We have a new billboard to promote White Bird Dental Clinic​ up by the Crisis Services Center at 990 W. 7th Avenue. The campaign is part of our effort to spread the word that the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members have dental coverage that covers annual cleanings, x-rays, fillings, and other services that keep teeth healthy. Help spread the word!

Key messages

  • English: Oregon Health Plan members have dental coverage.
    Spanish: Los miembros del Plan de Salud de Oregon cuentan con cobertura dental.
  • English: The Oregon Health Plan (OHP) covers annual cleanings, x-rays, fillings, and other services that keep your teeth healthy.
    Spanish: El Plan de Salud de Oregon cubre limpiezas anuales, radiografías, y otros servicios de rutina que mantienen a tus dientes saludables.

Needle Exchange & Naloxone Finder

Needle Exchange

HIV Alliance has five locations and runs needle exchange sites 6 times a week in Lane County, including a new site at White Bird Medical on Wednesdays. The Needle Exchange program aims to protect public safety and community health by reducing the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C due to people sharing syringes. The program works to keep sterile syringes accessible so that those who inject drugs or hormones do not feel a need to share their syringes and risk becoming infected with HIV, HCV, or another blood-borne disease.

Eugene Office
1195 City View St., Eugene, OR 97402
Tuesdays from 1pm-3pm
Fridays from 1pm-5pm

ShelterCare
499 W. 4th Ave., Eugene, OR 97401
Mondays from 6-7:30pm

White Bird Medical Clinic
1400 Mill St, Eugene, OR 97401
Wednesdays from 6-7:30pm

Highway 99
456 Hwy. 99 (Lindholm Center Parking Lot), Eugene, OR 97402
Thursdays from 9:45am-12pm

Springfield
South 18th and A, Springfield, OR 97477
Thursdays from 6-7:30pm

HIV Alliance continues to do testing for HCV, HIV and other STIs four days a week at their office: Mondays from 3-7pm

  • Tuesdays from 5-7pm
  • Wednesdays NO TESTING
  • Thursdays from 5pm-8pm
  • Fridays from 1pm-5pm

Testing for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Syphilis: Call for times: 541-342-5088

Naxolone Finder

The Naloxone Finder is intended for people who use drugs to access naloxone in their community.

While many of the programs listed offer additional harm reduction supplies (e.g. syringes, safer smoking kits, drop-in centers), the Harm Reduction Coalition has vetted the programs for community-based naloxone that is free and intended for people who use drugs. They will update this map on a bi-monthly basis and have included space for programs to update their information regarding specific requirements or changes due to COVID-19.

Safe Respirator Use

Notes:

  • Cloth (wet or dry), paper masks and tissues will NOT filter out wildfire smoke.
  • Respirators are not designed to fit children.
  • Facial hair prevents proper fit and reduces effectiveness.
  • Use a respirator only after first trying more effective methods to avoid smoke.
  • That includes staying indoors and reducing activity.

Download PDF

Smoke and COVID-19 Fact Sheet

Quality Improvement Medical Writer/QI Support Specialist

This position supports the Chief Medical Officer, Clinic Administration and Program Coordinators in maintaining the Clinic’s Quality Assurance / Quality Improvement program.

Pay and Benefits:

This position is being hired for up to 40 hours per week beginning at $15 with an increase to $18/hour upon completion of probation and year of service.  This position includes Medical, Dental, and Vision benefits.

Responsibilities:

  • Manage Agency QA/QI Calendar and support Program staff in managing scheduled tasks.
  • Assist Program staff in documenting QA/QI efforts (PDSA’s) for the improvement of patient services (50% or more of this positions responsibilities)
  • Organize, support, and document regular Peer Review audits in all HRSA Programs.
  • Organize, support, and document regular Chart Reviews in all HRSA Programs.
  • Organize and support ongoing Client Satisfaction Survey Process:
    • maintain and update client satisfaction surveys to meet requirements outlined by various funders at the County, State, and Federal level
    • work with White Bird Programs to administer client surveys as required by Clinic policies
    • compile client data and analyze survey data. Disseminate survey results to across the agency
  • Organize and support Client Focus Groups:
    • periodic organization of client focus groups to solicit client feedback
    • schedule and facilitate client focus groups designed to address specific client needs
    • compile and analyze client feedback. Disseminate report to Admin and Program staff
  • Participate as a member of audit preparation teams (such as HRSA Site Review committees) as needed.
  • Provide clerical support to the Agency’s Quality Management Team (meeting minutes, documentation, etc.)

Requirements:

  • At least one year of relevant project management and QI experience preferred
  • Interest in and knowledge of community health, behavioral health, and primary care
  • Knowledge of principles and standards related to QI and Plan, Do, Study, Act (PDSA) Cycles
  • Electronic health record (EHR) experience (NextGen EHR Preferred)
  • Strong communication and presentation skills, training/meeting facilitation skills a plus
  • Solid relationship building and interpersonal skills
  • Excellent writing, research, analytical and time management skills. Ability to work to a deadline.
  • Excellent coordination skills, including multitasking and setting priorities on work assignments.
  • Proficiency with Microsoft Office Suite
  • High degree of independence, flexibility, initiative, and commitment
  • Ability to work effectively with diverse populations, both internally and externally
  • Demonstrated awareness and value of cultural competence
  • Commitment to improving the patient experience.
  • Ability to work remotely
  • Complete White Bird New Employee Orientation/Training
  • A Sense of Humor!

Preferred:

  • Bachelor’s degree and/or a combination of equivalent education or experience in health sciences, business, or related field
  • Experience in outpatient settings or clinical settings
  • Experience in or with an FQHC preferred
  • Experience working in a consensus environment
  • Bilingual in English/Spanish

Accountability: This position reports to the Chief Medical Officer.

NOTE: This position has a six-month probationary period.

Apply Here

The Invisible Class

On Thursday, Feb. 6th at 6:30pm at the Broadway Metro Theater, Encircle Films will present “The Invisible Class,” a film that explores what it means to be homeless in America, challenging stereotypes and examining the systematic causes of mass homelessness in the wealthiest nation in the world. A panel discussion with Benjamin Brubaker, clinical co-coordinator at White Bird Clinic, will follow and White Bird staff will be available with copies of the new resource guide, “The Little Help Book,” a navigation book for people experiencing homelessness in Eugene.

Broadway Metro Theater
888 Willamette St.
Eugene, OR 97401
(541) 686-2458

$9 ADULTS
$8 STUDENTS (WITH ID)
$6 SENIORS (62+)

SOLD OUT