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Shelter-in-Place Supply Drive

White Bird Clinic at 341 E 12th Ave. is operating as a distribution site for people experiencing homelessness. Unhoused individuals can access resources, pick-up supplies, and learn about COVID-19 prevention and symptoms.

Individuals who are already safely sheltering in place elsewhere are advised to stay where they are and access supplies through the distribution site or outreach teams. We need help supplying these folks with tents and tarps, sleeping bags, and personal care items that can help to clean, comfort, and groom a person’s body while they are sheltering-in-place.

Items can be dropped off between 9am and 5pm or you can contact us to arrange for a pickup.

You can also support our efforts by donating directly to our COVID-19 campaign. We’re in this together ❤️

Mental Health Resources During COVID-19

Looking for our COVID-19 community resource page? We moved it over here.

As leaders on the frontlines of mental illness and substance abuse disorder treatment, we know how difficult it can be to cope with the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 amidst the loss of familiar resources. Fear and anxiety about a disease can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions. Coping with stress will make you, the people you care about, and your community stronger.

People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment and be aware of new or worsening symptoms. The White Bird Crisis line will continue to be accessible 24/7 by phone at (541) 687-4000. For an in-person response, CAHOOTS continues to operate 24/7 at this time, if you are in Eugene please call (541) 682-5111, for those in Springfield please call (541) 726-3714.

Telehealth

Telehealth appointments are available for both new and returning Counseling and Chrysalis clients. Intake forms for new clients are now available online.

Online Support Groups

AA   NA   GA

7 Cups: www.7cups.com Free online text chat with a trained listener for emotional support and counseling. Also offers fee for-service online therapy with a licensed mental health professional. Service/website also offered in Spanish.

Emotions Anonymous: www.emotionsanonymous.org An international fellowship of people who desire to have a better sense of emotional well-being. EA members have in person and online weekly meetings available in more than 30 countries with 600 active groups worldwide. The EA is nonprofessional resource and cannot be a replacement to therapy.

Support Group Central: www.supportgroupscentral.com Offers virtual support groups on numerous mental health conditions – free or low-cost. Website also offered in Spanish.

The Tribe Wellness Community: www.support.therapytribe.com Free, online peer support groups which is tailored to members who are facing mental health challenges and/or difficult family dynamics. Support groups include Addiction, Anxiety, Depression, HIV/AIDS, LGBT, Marriage/Family, OCD and Teens.

For Like Minds: www.forlikeminds.com Online mental health support network that allows for individuals to connect with others who are living with or supporting someone with mental health conditions, substance use disorders, and stressful life events.

Guidebooks & Tip Sheets

The NAMI HelpLine Coronavirus Information and Resources Guide may be helpful if you have questions or concerns.

SAMHSA’s Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, and Isolation tip sheet describes feelings and thoughts you may have during and after social distancing, quarantine, and isolation. It also suggests ways to care for your behavioral health during these experiences and provides resources for more help.

Text/Chat

News about the coronavirus can increase feelings of anxiety. If you’re struggling, text Mental Heath First Aid to 741-741 to talk to a CrisisTextLine counselor.

HOOTS (Helping Out Our Teens in Schools) offering mental health support during school closures

In light of school closures due to COVID-19. HOOTS (Helping Out Our Teens in Schools) is offering mental health support by phone for students, families, and staff of high schools in the 4J, Springfield, Bethel, Oakridge and South Lane school districts. The phone line is staffed by crisis counselors who normally work the HOOTS school clinics, or work on CAHOOTS.

The phone line is accessible from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM Monday through Friday. Video support is available from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM on weekdays and is accessed by emailing hoots@whitebirdclinic.org with your name and preferred time. We are able to provide short term counseling and mental health support, resource referrals and OHP sign up.

  • For students, families and staff of 4J, Eugene Charter and Bethel High Schools please call (541) 246-2342.
  • For students, families and staff of Springfield, Oakridge and South Lane High Schools please call (541) 246-2332.

The White Bird Crisis line will continue to be accessible 24/7 by phone at (541) 687-4000. 15th Night will also be continuing to offer support and resources for unhoused youth and those working with them via phone and text at (541) 246-4046.

For an in-person response, CAHOOTS continues to operate 24/7 at this time, if you are in Eugene please call (541) 682-5111, for those in Springfield please call (541) 726-3714.

Health Alert: COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

The interim guidance we’re providing is based on what is currently known about COVID-19. We will update this interim guidance as additional information becomes available. Call the Lane County Help Line at 541-682-1380 between ​​​​​​​9am-4pm, M-F or visit www.lanecountyor.gov/coronavirus for the latest information.

White Bird Clinic is actively monitoring and preparing for the potential spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in our communities. The safety and health of our clients, volunteers and staff is our priority.

In times of crisis, White Bird is a key agency in the continuum of care for our community. We are Lane County’s Crisis Intervention Service. We are the Mobile Crisis and Medic response team for Eugene-Springfield’s Public Safety System. We are a member of Lane County Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD).

Our emergency services are crucial, and we will continue to provide compassionate humanistic healthcare and supportive services to individuals in our community to the best of our ability, so everyone receives the care they need. Operational changes and closures will be posted to our web site.

Misinformation is spreading quickly, so be certain to rely on the resources provided here or from the Center for Disease Control and PreventionOregon Health Authority and Lane County Public Health.

Coronavirus Symptoms are similar to the flu: coughing, fevers, and shortness of breath. The virus spreads in two main ways:

  • A sick person coughs or sneezes very tiny droplets full of the virus. A well person close by (within 6 feet) gets those droplets in their nose or mouth, or into their lungs.
  • The droplets land on a surface or objects, or from the sick person’s hand after covering a cough. A well person touches something with the virus on it, then touches their own nose or mouth or face.

Be aware of your most vulnerable neighbors

Anyone can get infected. Most people have mild symptoms and get better on their own. Some people get very sick, especially those who are older or have other serious health conditions (heart or lung diseases or weak immune system).

Help limit the spread of infections

  • Wash your hands when you can, especially with soap and warm water. Or use sanitizer. Both can help.
  • Avoid touching your nose, eyes and mouth.
  • Avoid sharing personal items — cigarettes, food, utensils etc. — as much as possible.
  • If you have a new cough and might be sick, cover your nose and mouth with a mask or bandana, or stay 6 feet away from others as much as possible. Try to spread out your camp. If possible, sick people should sleep separately from well people.

Taking care of a sick person

There is no specific medicine for COVID-19. Mildly sick may look like: cough, sneezing, sore throat, fever and aches. Try: sleep, rest, Tylenol for fever (no aspirin or nsaids), and drink fluids

If someone gets very sick, get medical help right away.

That looks like difficulty breathing, pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen, or they’re unable to drink or keep liquids down. An ambulance will come like usual if you call 911. The paramedics will be wearing extra masks and coverings to keep themselves healthy so they can keep working.

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