Category community health | White Bird Clinic

COVID-19 Centro de Recursos

Ahora Abierto

Punto de registro de lugares temporarios de refugio, suministro para tiendas de campana, evaluación de COVID-19, ropa, agua potable, estaciones de para lavarse las manos, y baños. Abierto diariamente de 9am a 5pm

341 E 12th Ave, Eugene, OR
541-342-8255

Recursos de la comunidad


Ayude a proteger nuestra comunidad

Estas son algunas ideas para mantenerse seguro

Mantenga su lugar limpio

Limpie toda las superficies que sus manos hayan tocado, antes y después de ser usadas, con tallas desinfectantes, alcohol (de al menos 60%), o cloro (agua lavandina).

Si usted se enferma

Quédese en casa si usted puede y trate de minimizar el contacto cercano con otras personas. Controle su fiebre, y evite estar con otros mientras usted este enfermos. Si usted tienen que estar alrededor de otras personas, use un barbijo así de esta manera usted no tose en los demás y transmite el virus. Si los síntomas se transforman en severos, valla al servicio médico de urgencia o al departamento de emergencia.

Cuide de usted mismo

Si usted está en cuarentena, atienda su salud mental y asegúrese de tener todo lo indispensable y el mayor apoyo posible (apoyo emocional, alimentos, higiene, medicamentos, económico) White Bird Clinic tiene servicios de telesalud, consejería, tratamientos de salud mental y los beneficios de servicios de asistencia están disponibles para ayudar.


Servicios de Crisis: White Bird es el servicio primario de Lane County de servicio gratis de intervención de crisis. Por más de 50 años, nosotros hemos estado ofreciendo servicio inmediato, a corto plazo, por teléfono las 24 horas del día.

541-687-4000
1-800-422-7558

CAHOOTS: Asistencia de ayuda en caso de crisis en las calles CAHOOTS provee 24/7 inmediata estabilización en caso de urgencia médica o crisis psicológica, información y referidos, consejería, y asesoramiento en los pasos a seguir en terapia.

Eugene: (541) 682-5111
Springfield: (541) 726-3714

COVID-19 Resource Center

White Bird Clinic has partnered with the City of Eugene, Carry it Forward, and Lane County to develop a comprehensive sheltering system that will allow unhoused individuals to choose the shelter option that best meets their needs. Providing unhoused individuals a place to shelter-in-place along with the rest of the community improves public health and reduces morbidity and mortality from COVID-19. Supporting community-wide sheltering in place is the surest way to protect the whole community’s health.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by White Bird Clinic (@whitebirdclinic) on


White Bird will operate the system’s resource distribution hub, providing tents, sleeping bags, clothing, and personal hygiene items. Diverse sheltering options are offered as available: support services for an existing encampment, motel rooms for individuals diagnosed with COVID-19, indoor shelters, and designated temporary shelter sites. Camp sites and shelters host food distribution, hygiene facilities, and social services upon request.

Designated temporary shelter sites are locations where small groups of people (up to 10 people or 6 tents) can camp in tents or vehicles with appropriate social distancing, and will be supported with hygiene stations (portable restrooms and handwashing stations), food and supplies, and welfare checks. The locations will also have privacy fencing in place to help support the security of the site. The sites are managed by White Bird and Carry It Forward, local homeless service providers.

Why are these sites being established?
Based on CDC guidelines, the City of Eugene is working with our partners at Lane County and Springfield to reduce the need for people to travel around the community to access basic needs and shelter. Reducing this movement helps protect everyone. Since these vulnerable community members may not have a home to “stay home” in, we are working to help them shelter in place or create places where they can be safely. In addition to our mobile homeless outreach teams and hygiene stations, designated temporary shelter sites are another strategy to help flatten the curve and reduce community transmission of COVID-19.

Why are they located in our community center parking lots?
As a result of the current Stay Home Save Lives order, City community centers are closed to the public at this time. The closure of the centers provides the opportunity to utilize currently unused parking lot space to create small, temporary sites for people who need a place to take shelter. The configuration and location of the sites support CDC recommendations for social distancing for people who are unhoused and allows them to be secure and managed by local social service providers. In addition, having people on-site at the closed community centers may also help reduce negative activity at the centers as there will be people nearby to discourage that activity.

In addition, as part of its COVID-19 response, Lane County has also established two temporary respite sites where unhoused individuals can receive services, including a safe place to sleep, meals, showers and medical screenings. The first site, in Eugene, is the Lane County Fairgrounds. People showing no symptoms or signs of illness will be placed in the convention center. Those who are showing signs of illness will be directed to the Wheeler Pavilion. The second site, in Springfield, is the Memorial Building, owned by Willamalane Park and Recreation District.

Lane County has contracted with St. Vincent de Paul to operate the shelter aspect of these sites and is working with Occupy Medical as the medical screening resource. Participation in the service is voluntary. Only the individuals staying at one of the locations overnight will have access to the facilities.

Who will be at the designated temporary shelter sites?
The sites will be designated for people experiencing homelessness who are unable to find shelter. In order to get an assigned space at the shelter sites, individuals need to check-in at the White Bird distribution site first and receive a basic medical screening. Asymptomatic high-risk individuals, such as people over 65 or with certain underlying health conditions (respiratory, compromised immunities, chronic disease) may be prioritized for these sites.

How long will they be located here?
We don’t have a specific timeline at this point, but we anticipate it will be for the duration of the Stay Home, Save Lives order.

How will the sites be managed?
The sites will be managed by local social service providers, White Bird and Carry It Forward. Site staff will provide ongoing health check-ins with shelter site participants and general upkeep of the site to help ensure the health and safety of individuals at the site and minimize impacts to the surrounding area and neighborhood.

<

iframe style=”border: none; overflow: hidden;” src=”https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?


Who do I contact if I have a concern?
For specific site concerns you can contact Alex Farmer with White Bird Clinic at 541-342-8255. For questions for the City, please contact the City Manager’s Office at 541-682-5010.

Download Fact Sheet

White Bird Clinic Receives $675,000 as Part of CARES Act

More Funding Critical as Health Centers Face Financial Uncertainty Due to Pandemic

It was announced Tuesday that 30 Oregon Community Health Centers (CHCs) will receive more than $23 million in federal funds to help health centers detect, prevent, diagnose, and treat those dealing with COVID-19, as well as maintain or increase health capacity and staffing levels to address this public health emergency. Awards in Oregon range from about $522,000 to a little over $1.7 million per health center.

Health center funding is being made available immediately, according to a news release from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health and Human Services (HHS). HHS, through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), awarded $1.3 billion to 1,387 health centers across the nation as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, or CARES Act.

“Oregon’s CHCs are thankful for this supplemental funding during these unprecedented times,” said Joan Watson-Patko, OPCA’s Executive Director. “However, the fact remains that additional immediate emergency funding is essential in order to keep health centers open. Oregon’s health centers have stepped up to meet the needs of the communities they serve to care for patients in response to the COVID-19 crisis, and in doing so, face huge financial losses that could impact their ability to provide care. Recent analysis estimates the financial impact of COVID-19 to health centers in Oregon is over $57 million.”

White Bird Clinic, for example, has stood up additional services and programs at significant cost and strain to existing operations. “Additional emergency dollars have made it possible for health centers to innovate and respond to their communities,” said Chris Hecht, executive coordinator at White Bird Clinic in Eugene. “However, the investments made today do not support the long-term viability of community health centers. Our programs have reduced hours and services and we’re furloughing staff to support our response to the current crisis. When it’s over, many health centers may not have the resources to reopen closed programs.”

White Bird Clinic provides primary care and dental services, a drug and alcohol treatment program, crisis intervention, and homeless case management with priority to those who are unserved, underinsured, disabled and/or homeless. “Community health centers are uniquely positioned in the health care system to immediately respond to emerging community needs in a way that isn’t possible for our government or larger health system partners,” said Hecht.

Federal Community Health Center funding is set to expire on Nov. 30 without action by Congress. “Ensuring long-term stable funding for community Health Centers is critical so Oregon CHCs can continue to provide care now during this pandemic and in the future,” said Watson-Patko. “As part of the largest primary care network in the United States, our health centers remain committed to keeping their doors open and to providing care to people who may otherwise not have access to services and those hardest hit during economic downturns.

Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act Supplemental Funding

$23,256,870 to support 30 health centers

HEALTH CENTER GRANTEE CITY STATE FUNDING AMOUNT
ADAPT ROSEBURG OR $567,350
ASHER COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER FOSSIL OR $522,530
BANDON COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER BANDON OR $551,075
BENTON COUNTY CORVALLIS OR $711,800
CENTRAL CITY CONCERN PORTLAND OR $663,530
CLACKAMAS, COUNTY OF OREGON CITY OR $859,565
COLUMBIA RIVER COMMUNITY HEALTH SERVICES BOARDMAN OR $600,230
COUNTY OF LANE EUGENE OR $1,102,715
KLAMATH HEALTH PARTNERS INC KLAMATH FALLS OR $704,840
LA CLINICA DEL VALLE FAMILY HEALTH CARE CENTER INC MEDFORD OR $1,166,525
LAPINE COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER LA PINE OR $637,175
LINCOLN, COUNTY OF NEWPORT OR $608,360
MOSAICMEDICAL PRINEVILLE OR $930,515
MULTNOMAH, COUNTY OF PORTLAND OR $1,763,780
NATIVE AMERICAN REHABILITATION ASSOCIATION INC PORTLAND OR $581,345
NEIGHBORHOOD HEALTH CENTER PORTLAND OR $872,150
NORTHWEST HUMAN SERVICES, INC. SALEM OR $733,175
ONE COMMUNITY HEALTH HOOD RIVER OR $750,950
OREGON HEALTH & SCIENCE UNIVERSITY PORTLAND OR $777,770
OUTSIDE IN PORTLAND OR $640,580
RINEHART MEDICAL CLINIC WHEELER OR $522,680
ROGUE COMMUNITY HEALTH MEDFORD OR $747,845
SISKIYOU COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER, INC. GRANTS PASS OR $830,930
TILLAMOOK COUNTY TILLAMOOK OR $597,005
UMPQUA COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER, INC ROSEBURG OR $740,945
VIRGINIA GARCIA MEMORIAL HEALTH CENTER ALOHA OR $1,578,245
WALLACE MEDICAL CONCERN, THE PORTLAND OR $653,195
WATERFALL CLINIC, INCORPORATED NORTH BEND OR $576,590
WHITE BIRD CLINIC EUGENE OR $675,860
WINDING WATERS MEDICAL CLINIC ENTERPRISE OR $587,615

About CHCs:

Oregon’s community health centers deliver integrated medical, dental and behavioral health services to many of the state’s most vulnerable communities through over 200 locations statewide. Over 430,000 Oregonians receive their care at a community health center, including one in four people on the Oregon Health Plan. Over 73% of patients live below the poverty line, and 94% live at or below 200% of the Federal Poverty Level. Over 75% of community health centers have clinic sites serving rural communities, 30% of Oregon’s community health centers are federally recognized as Health Care for the Homeless locations, and 33% are designated as Migrant Health Centers.

Health Alert: COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

The interim guidance we’re providing is based on what is currently known about COVID-19. We will update this interim guidance as additional information becomes available. Call the Lane County Help Line at 541-682-1380 between ​​​​​​​9am-4pm, M-F or visit www.lanecountyor.gov/coronavirus for the latest information.

White Bird Clinic is actively monitoring and preparing for the potential spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in our communities. The safety and health of our clients, volunteers and staff is our priority.

In times of crisis, White Bird is a key agency in the continuum of care for our community. We are Lane County’s Crisis Intervention Service. We are the Mobile Crisis and Medic response team for Eugene-Springfield’s Public Safety System. We are a member of Lane County Community Organizations Active in Disaster (COAD).

Our emergency services are crucial, and we will continue to provide compassionate humanistic healthcare and supportive services to individuals in our community to the best of our ability, so everyone receives the care they need. Operational changes and closures will be posted to our web site.

Misinformation is spreading quickly, so be certain to rely on the resources provided here or from the Center for Disease Control and PreventionOregon Health Authority and Lane County Public Health.

Coronavirus Symptoms are similar to the flu: coughing, fevers, and shortness of breath. The virus spreads in two main ways:

  • A sick person coughs or sneezes very tiny droplets full of the virus. A well person close by (within 6 feet) gets those droplets in their nose or mouth, or into their lungs.
  • The droplets land on a surface or objects, or from the sick person’s hand after covering a cough. A well person touches something with the virus on it, then touches their own nose or mouth or face.

Be aware of your most vulnerable neighbors

Anyone can get infected. Most people have mild symptoms and get better on their own. Some people get very sick, especially those who are older or have other serious health conditions (heart or lung diseases or weak immune system).

Help limit the spread of infections

  • Wash your hands when you can, especially with soap and warm water. Or use sanitizer. Both can help.
  • Avoid touching your nose, eyes and mouth.
  • Avoid sharing personal items — cigarettes, food, utensils etc. — as much as possible.
  • If you have a new cough and might be sick, cover your nose and mouth with a mask or bandana, or stay 6 feet away from others as much as possible. Try to spread out your camp. If possible, sick people should sleep separately from well people.

Taking care of a sick person

There is no specific medicine for COVID-19. Mildly sick may look like: cough, sneezing, sore throat, fever and aches. Try: sleep, rest, Tylenol for fever (no aspirin or nsaids), and drink fluids

If someone gets very sick, get medical help right away.

That looks like difficulty breathing, pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen, or they’re unable to drink or keep liquids down. An ambulance will come like usual if you call 911. The paramedics will be wearing extra masks and coverings to keep themselves healthy so they can keep working.

Also See:

Cold Weather is Here

White Bird’s Stay Warm Drive Activates

download press release

EUGENE, OREGON – With the onset of cold weather, our most vulnerable community members who are living outdoors face freezing winter conditions. White Bird Clinic is sending out a call for any and all winter gear, particularly socks, warm gloves, blankets and sleeping bags.

For those who spend most of their time outdoors, winter in Eugene can be dangerous, as wet, cold weather makes it hard to stay healthy. Your donation of winter gear makes a difference for people who don’t have a warm and dry place to live. White Bird asks you to partner with us to support under-resourced community members and strengthen our shared culture of caring for one another.

Please bring donations to our main clinic building at 341 E 12th Ave. in Eugene:

  • Blankets
  • Sleeping bags
  • Coats/Jackets/Sweaters
  • Warm pants
  • Socks/Gloves/Scarves
  • Rain gear
  • Tarps

We’re happy to pick up larger donations. Please call 541-342-8255.

White Bird’s Front Room program offers a warm and dry space. Open from 8am-10pm daily and located at 341 E 12th St. in Eugene, we welcome the community to come in from the cold.


In 1969, a group of student activists and concerned practitioners came together to provide crisis services and free medical care for counter-culture youth in Eugene, OR. Having grown continuously since then, today White Bird Clinic has 10 programs, 220 staff members, and more than 400 volunteers each year.

To celebrate fifty years of service, White Bird is growing, demonstrating our commitment to serving low income, under-resourced community members. We’re expanding many different programs at once, so we’re turning to the community for support and partnership. Please call 541.342.8255 or visit www.whitebirdclinic.org to donate to the project of your choice.

library

Volunteer Fair at the Library

We’re tabling at a volunteer fair with a focus on addressing homelessness on Thursday, November 14, 6:00pm to 7:30pm at the Eugene Public Library. Come meet with us and our local nonprofit and government partners, find out about our services, and learn about volunteer opportunities and other ways to support this crucial work.

Also Attending:

Catholic Community Services of Lane County, Inc. (CCS), Centro Latino Americano, City of Eugene Government / Community Court, Egan Warming Center, Eugene Mission, FOOD For Lane County, Hosea Youth Services, Lane County Health & Human Services, Looking Glass, ShelterCare, SquareOne Villages, St. Vincent de Paul Society of Lane County, White Bird Clinic, Willamette Family Inc., and Womenspace.

New Health Plan Choices for OHP in Lane County

Did you get a “Pick Your Plan” letter from OHP?

download flyer

This means you have choices to make by November 17 about your health plan for 2020. Health care benefits are staying the same but Lane County has new health plan choices. White Bird Clinic’s Sharing Healthcare Options Program (SHOP) program is here to help at the locations and times below and by appointment. Contact 541-342-1295 for more information.

EUGENE

Catholic Community Services, 1464 W 6th Ave, 3rd Wednesday of the month, 9:00am – 11:00am

Eugene Public Library, 100 W 10th Ave, Friday 11-2pm

Eugene Service Station, 450 Hwy 99 N, every other Thursday, 10-12pm

Eugene Mission, 1542 W 1st Ave, Mondays, 8-10am

White Bird Clinic, 341 E 12th Ave, 10-4 pm, Tuesday-Wednesday

SPRINGFIELD

Catholic Community Services, 1025 G St – Springfield, Last Wednesday of the month, 9:00am – 11:00am

Department Of Human Services, 101 30th St, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 1-3pm

Learn More

Mental Health First Aid USA for Older Adults: April 19 in Florence, OR

Mental Health First Aid USA for Older Adults is an 8 hour public education program which introduces participants to the unique risk factors and warning signs of mental health problems in adults over the age of 65, builds understanding of the importance of early intervention, and teaches individuals how to help an older adult in crisis or experiencing a mental health challenge. Mental Health First Aid uses role-playing and simulations to demonstrate how to assess a mental health crisis; select interventions and provide initial help; and connect older adults to professional, peer, social, and self-help care.

The training will be held at the Siuslaw Fire & Rescue 2625 Highway 101, Florence, OR 97439 from 8:30 am-5:30pm and will have light breakfast & lunch provided. The fee for the course is $49.00 per participant.

Register Online Today!

snowstorm

❄️ Ice/Snow Emergency Update

A brief situation report on the Ice/Snow Emergency as of March 1, 2019 at 7:00am.

INFORMATION

Lane County has opened a Non-Emergency Call Center for inquiries related to winter weather at 541-682-3977. The call center will run from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

If you know of a vulnerable individual, who is in need of assistance (homebound, medically fragile) you can contact the Lane County Public Inquiry Center at 541-682-3799 to let them know. Any emergency or threat to life should go directly to 911.

DAY ACCESS

White Bird Clinic’s Front Rooms day access program (341 E 12th Ave) is open until 10pm tonight and St. Vincent DePaul’s Lindholm Center (456 Highway 99) is open today until 5pm. The following community centers are open from 9am to 5pm.

  • Amazon Center 2700 Hilyard St. Eugene, OR 97405
  • Campbell Community Center, 155 High St. Eugene, OR 97401
  • Echo Hollow Pool, 1655 Echo Hollow Rd. **free showers
  • Hilyard Community Center, 2580 Hilyard Street
  • Petersen Barn, 870 Bertzen Rd. Eugene, OR 97401
  • Sheldon Community Center, 2445 Willakenzie Rd.
  • Sheldon Pool, 2443 Willakenzie Rd. **free showers
  • Downtown Eugene Public Library, 100 W. 10th Ave

CRISIS SERVICES

CAHOOTS mobile crisis is available in Eugene through the police-fire-ambulance communications center, 541-682-5111 and within the Springfield urban growth boundary through the non-emergency number, 541-726-3714. Crisis walk-in and phone support is available at 341 E 12th Ave.

PROGRAMS

DentalMedical, Homeless, and SHOP programs are open. Dental is holding an Urgent Care Clinic at 8:00AM. Chrysalis is open by appointment and for groups as scheduled. Call 541-342-8255 to confirm Mental Health Counseling appointments in advance.

HAZARDS

Public Works crews continue to clear roads and downed trees. Read about response efforts…

SHELTER

The Eugene Mission will be open tonight. The Egan Warming Centers will ACTIVATE today, Friday (03/01). They are on STANDBY for Saturday (03/02) and Sunday (03/03)!

FOOD

Meals on Wheels in Eugene will be delivering frozen meals today. Routes will be modified to prioritize delivery to the most vulnerable recipients. FFLC will be open but the Dining Room will be closed and will hopefully re-open on Monday.

TRANSPORTATION

LTD has returned all routes to regular weekday schedule. Most routes are no longer on snow detour. EmX buses are still dealing with some inaccessible platforms. Check with the EmX service alert for the current status of which EmX stations are being served. Before leaving in the home or work, visit LTD.org/service-alerts to see if your route is operating or on detour. For snow and ice route maps visit LTD.org/snow.

BASIC NEEDS

White Bird Clinic has identified a critical need for adult sized BOOTS in light of the inclement weather conditions that are likely to continue over the next week. If you are able, please take your donations of adult boots (used or new) to White Bird Clinic at 341 E 12th Avenue between 8am and 10pm. We will get them to people with the greatest needs.

Community Health Survey

Live Healthy Lane is conducting a survey to inform the next Community Health Improvement Plan. The survey is open through February 28, 2019.

About the Community Health Improvement Plan
In 2017, out of 36 counties in Oregon, Lane County ranks 13th for health outcomes (length of life and quality of life) and 12th for health factors (health behaviors, clinical care, social & economic factors, and physical environment). Based on the findings from the Community Health Needs Assessment, the Lane County Regional Community Health Improvement Plan (CHIP) outlines how we’ll work together to make improve behavioral, physical, and oral health, including overall well-being. Click here to read the Community Health Improvement Plan report and other documents.

 

White Bird Offers Mental Health First Aid Classes

Mental Health First Aid is an 8-hour course that teaches you how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. The training gives you the skills you need to reach out and provide initial help and support to someone who may be developing a mental health or substance use problem or experiencing a crisis. Most of us would know how to help if we saw someone having a heart attack—we’d start CPR, or at the very least, call 9-1-1. But too few of us would know how to respond if we saw someone having a panic attack or if we were concerned that a friend or co-worker might be showing signs of alcoholism.

Mental Health First Aid takes the fear and hesitation out of starting conversations about mental health and substance use problems by improving understanding and providing an action plan that teaches people to safely and responsibly identify and address a potential mental illness or substance use disorder. When more people are equipped with the tools they need to start a dialogue, more people can get to the help they may need. Mental Health First Aiders can even save lives.

Trainings will be from 8:30 am-5:30pm and will have light breakfast & lunch provided. Students can register using the links below or go to https://whitebirdclinic.org/education to register for multiple classes at once. For more information, including alternate payment options, please contact anne@whitebirdclinic.org.

Mental Health First Aid is intended for all people and organizations that make up the fabric of a community. Professionals who regularly interact with a lot of people (such as police officers, human resource directors, politicians, and primary care workers), school and college leadership, faith communities, advocates for the unhoused, friends and family of individuals with mental illness or addiction, encampment managers and allies, parents, or anyone interested in learning more about mental illness and addiction should get trained.

White Bird Clinic Stands in Solidarity with the Transgender Community 

White Bird Clinic stands in solidarity with our transgender/gender diverse clients, co-workers, and community members in affirming the validity of their existence and right to personally define and express their identities.

We resist any statement claiming that gender is a biological or immutable condition determined by genitalia. Both categories of sex and gender are infinitely diverse and complex in their expressions and cannot be limited to a binary system. To dictate how an individual personally identifies stands in direct conflict with our humanistic values of self-determination, freedom of expression, and valuing of diversity.

To our transgender/gender diverse clients, co-workers, and community members:

We see you in your diversity and complexity, we affirm your existence and your right to safety. We see the pain and harm created by statements that attempt to erase your existence. We will not stand idly by while those in power fan the flames of injustice, violence, and bigotry.

We are committed to providing accessible, safe, and affirming services to transgender and gender nonconforming people free from discrimination and in congruence with the recommendations of several highly regarded professional organizations:

  • American Medical Association
  • American Nurses Association
  • American Academy of Pediatrics
  • American Psychological Association
  • American Psychiatric Association
  • National Association of Social Workers
  • World Professional Association for Transgender Health
  • OHSU Transgender Health Program

…..And many others, who recognize gender is expansive beyond a binary and is not determined by one’s genitalia and sex assigned at birth.

White Bird Clinic will stand true to our mission statement in continuing to enable all people to gain control of their social, emotional, and physical well-being. We recognize the innumerable harms that systemic injustice and marginalization have on an individual’s mental health, and we are committed to seeking progressive change—on an individual, community, and national level—to make health and well-being accessible to the most vulnerable populations.

To be truly committed to our mission, we recognize the need to speak out when those on a national level attempt to undermine the well-being, personal safety, and mental health of transgender and gender non-conforming people. We are proud of our clients, co-workers, and community members who are bravely authentic in their gender identities. In doing so, you are helping us all break free from restrictive gender norms and social categories that harm every one of us, in varying ways.

In gratitude, we will continue to speak up, serve our community, and fight for personal freedom. Until the Revolution!

Authored by the White Bird Clinic Queer Affinity Group

Opiate Overdose Response

This past weekend represented an unusually high number of heroin and other opiate overdoses in the Eugene/Springfield area, but these overdoses have been in keeping with recently observed trends. There have been two distinct patterns of heroin and other opiate related overdoses occurring with increased frequency: poly-substance OD’s and fentanyl contaminated OD’s:

  • Poly-substance overdoses present a unique frustration to first-responders because they generally combine opiates, alcohol, and other substances often including benzodiazopenes or other prescription pharmaceuticals, which requires field stabilization and hospital treatment.
  • Fentanyl contamination has been detected in various street drugs and counterfeit prescription medications in the Pacific Northwest, and has been particularly common locally in a strain of heroin that has been encountered by users and first responders in recent weeks.

Lane Co. EMS, EPD, SPD, and CAHOOTS all carry the opiate overdose reversing medication Naloxone, commonly referred to by its trade name, Narcan. Naloxone is administered to treat overdose patients presenting with respiratory distress caused by the overdose, the medication enters the respiratory center of the brain stem and flushes neural synapses by out-competing the opiates present in the blood stream to to temporarily reverse respiratory inhibition; for patients whose breathing has ceased Naloxone is frequently administered along with CPR.

CAHOOTS, specifically, has not experienced a significant increase in overdose responses, largely because the increased public awareness of the opiate crisis has increased the aggressiveness of EMS and law enforcement responses to these emergencies. White Bird’s main clinic staff including the Crisis Team and Front Rooms/Reception staff have, on the other hand, reported a significant increase in interventions this year, with three incidents of Naloxone and CPR administration in the past 2 months. White Bird has begun the process of standardizing Naloxone training for all staff in addition to First Aid and CPR requirements.

Locally, the increased frequency of opiate overdoses has not been accompanied by a proportionate increase in overdose deaths. Increased public awareness has led to increased public involvement, with bystander-administered Naloxone and CPR saving brain tissue and lives prior to professional responders arriving on scene, and with increased awareness of Oregon’s Good Samaritan Law amongst drug users reducing the fear and stigma associated with calling 911 to seek assistance in an emergency.

The lives saved have demonstrated the benefits of harm reduction policies:

  • Public health education and outreach efforts increase awareness of the situation, increasing the likelihood of an overdose being recognized and treated.
  • Good Samaritan Laws provide bystanders who interact with law enforcement temporary respite from prosecution, decreasing the likelihood of an overdose patient being abandoned.
  • Broad availability of Naloxone—it is available over-the-counter at most pharmacies free of charge for individuals covered by private insurance or OHP and is also available free of charge along with training through HIV Alliance—increases the likelihood of the medication being available in the event of an emergency.
  • Bystander education including CPR training for community groups and Naloxone administration training for users, their peers, families, and those who work with them facilitates rapid overdose intervention.
  • Aggressive EMS and police responses to overdoses due to their increased public profile decreases the likelihood of overdose patients fleeing the scene of their resuscitation, only to cease breathing again due to lack of follow-up care.

The Eugene HIV Alliance, through their syringe exchange program, has made the injectable form of Narcan available. It also provides training to individuals and groups on how to administer it.

The syringe exchange is held five days a week at different locations, and the service is free.

CAHOOTS Receives 2018 Excellence in Public Health Award

On April 10th, CAHOOTS was selected by the Lane County Board of Commissioners as a recipient of the 2018 Excellence in Public Health Award. The award was presented during the Commissioners’ meeting to recognize the CAHOOTS team’s work in the field as behavioral health first responders, as well as their efforts in outreach, training, education, and support for individuals and groups throughout the area.

Valentine’s Day Flu Clinic

Show you care this Valentine’s Day by getting your flu shot. We’ll be offering free vaccinations from 1-3pm on Wednesday, February 14th at our offices at 341 E. 12th Avenue.

Look for us at the picnic tables out back.

Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that can cause mild to severe illness. Most experts think flu viruses are spread mainly by droplets when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. Less often, a person might also get the flu by touching a surface or object that has the flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth or nose.

People can spread the flu even if they don’t know they’re sick. The flu can be more serious for some people, including young children, pregnant women, older people, people with certain health conditions and smokers. The best way to prevent the flu is by getting vaccinated each year.

White Bird is Hiring

There are a number of positions now available at White Bird Clinic.

 Now Hiring

CAHOOTS Crisis Intervention Worker (relief)

CAHOOTS Medic

Clinical Support Specialist

Crisis Counselor

Drug and Alcohol Counselor

Financial Specialist

Medical Assistant

Mental Health Counselor

Public Benefits Advocate

National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Loan Repayment Program Opportunities

White Bird is an approved National Health Service Corps (NHSC) site in a Health Professional Shortage Area of greatest need. (HPSA Scores: Primary Care: 18, Dental: 20, Mental Health: 22) The following positions are eligible for student loan repayment through the National Health Services Corps.

Back Office RNThis position is being hired for up to 28 hours per week and the salary is equivalent to $24/hr.  This position is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the medical clinic’s back office including triage of unscheduled patients or potential patients, nurse visits, completing medical records, rooming patients, orienting volunteer RNs, completing referrals and diagnostics ordered by physician, and assisting the physician with treatment oriented needs as requested.


Back Office RN – Relief PoolThis position is being hired for up to 35 hours per week and the salary is equivalent to $24/hr. This position is responsible for the day-to-day operation of the medical clinic’s back office including triage of unscheduled patients or potential patients, nurse visits, completing medical records, rooming patients, orienting volunteer RNs, completing referrals and diagnostics ordered by physician, and assisting the physician with treatment oriented needs as requested.


Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMHNP)This position is being hired for up to 0.5 FTE, and the salary is equivalent to $48/hr. This position is responsible for providing direct patient care to our medical clinic’s patients and supporting the Medical Director/Staff Physician as needed.


Staff PhysicianThis position is being hired for up to 25 hours per week, and the salary is equivalent to $80/hr. Staff Physicians are responsible for healthcare delivery in an integrated, team-based, evidence based Patient Centered Medical Home.